How to write the Blockbuster book proposal How to sell your non-fiction book

How to write the Blockbuster book proposal How to sell your non-fiction book

How to write the Blockbuster book proposal How to sell your non-fiction book

You did it. He prepared the perfect consultation letter for his non-fiction book and, as a result, a publisher of a large publisher requested a complete book proposal. At this point, you have a 50/50 chance of seeing your work on the shelf of a bookstore. The creator of the difference will be a solid book proposal that shows the knowledge of your audience, what that audience needs and wants, and how you can reach that audience profitably.

When a publisher makes a request to see the proposal of your book, it is likely that he/she will send you a brief description of the guidelines of the publisher’s book proposal. You may want to make some subtle adjustments to your proposal to meet these guidelines. But under no circumstances should you wait for a book proposal to be requested before writing one. A professional book proposal, well written, takes several days, often several weeks, to compose. It must be the first thing you write, before the consultation letter and the manuscript. Despite the guidelines, each proposal is unique, and the quality of yours will be THE DEMAND for the difference in determining whether or not the publisher assumes a financial risk with his book. So put your best effort into making a blockbuster book proposal. Down,

Element # 1: The title page/table of contents: The first page of a book proposal is the title page. The title page indicates the job title for the book you are proposing along with your contact information (and that of your agent, if you have one). Make sure you center the text. In general, it is not advisable to use elegant borders or attractive graphics. You are writing a business proposal. Make sure it looks like one. On the second page of your proposal, provide a short table of contents for the book proposal. List each of the following sections along with their corresponding page numbers: Summary, About the author, Audience, Competition, Advertising, and promotional opportunities, Outline and Sample chapters. Some will say that the Sample and Sample Chapter sections are optional, but remember that you are trying to sell a book.

Element # 2: Summary: In the Summary section of your proposal, provide a brief description of the proposed book. Try to imagine the propaganda that will appear on the back cover of your final product. Make the propaganda in the first paragraph. Show the editor that you can hook him to his proposal from the first sentence, and convince them of his ability to hook a potential reader as well. Prepare the contents of your consultation letter addressing the following topics: the content, the audience, and the author. What is the premise of your book? What do you promise your reader? Who is the market for the book? How big is that market? And finally, why are you the best person to write this book at this time?

Element # 3: About the author: In the About the author section of your proposal, enter more details about yourself. In general, it is better to use the third person. But it’s okay to use the first person if you feel more comfortable doing it. Why are you the best-qualified person to write this book? What are your credentials? Are you an expert in the field? Has your previous work been published (not only in books but in newspapers, magazines, electronic publications, etc.)? Are you a prolific public speaker? If so, how many speeches do you make each year? What type of audience do you speak? Do you have experience in media or media contacts? If so, let the editor know. If you have limited experience in any or all of these fields, say so. Be honest and direct. Experience helps, but lack of experience itself will not lead to rejection. Misrepresent yourself

Element # 4: Public: in the Public section of your proposal, clearly define the market for your book. First, identify the demographic segment you expect to go to. Examples of demographic characteristics are gender, age, political ideology, religion, nationality, level of education, economic status, etc. Be specific to Investigate the size of the audience and support your claims with real numbers. Avoid general statements such as “everyone will love this book” and, instead, use statements such as “4.5 million Christian men with a college education between the ages of 21 and 29 will be attracted to this book because of its unique …” At this point, Define the psychography of your audience. What is the motivation of this demographic to buy your book? What unsatisfied needs and desires do you have that your book will surely satisfy? Soon,

Element # 5: Competency: in the Competition section of your proposal, provide examples of well-known published books similar to yours (or, if your book covers a new niche in a popular topic, make a list of books aimed at an audience Similarly). It is always better to cite the best sellers. If you can track the sales figures for these books, provide the number of copies that sold each title. The larger the sales figures, the more reinforces your case that there is a large market for your topic. Once you have established that there is a large market, explain why your book will be different. How will you position your book to differentiate it from your peers? Does any demographic trend help your case for continued demand in this market? State explicitly why your book is unique and why the market is ripe for its release. However, be wary of a bold statement such as “nothing like my book has been written before.” You may have discovered a unique angle for your subject, but in all probability, you have not invented a new genre or field of study.

Element # 6: Advertising and promotional opportunities: in this section of your proposal, describe the promotional routes open to your book. If you have already established that there is a market, this section will be the creation or division section of your proposal. The editor must know how he intends to reach the audience he has identified. Are there specific groups with a high probability of being receptive to your book? Good examples are members of the audience of a specific radio or television program, readers of specific magazines or newsletters, book clubs, non-profit organizations or business groups. Identify the relevant groups for your book and point out the vehicles that an editor can use to reach those groups in a profitable way. Do you have media connections or experience? Potential exposure in nationally syndicated radio and television programs is the best way to capture the attention of an editor. Booking the author at such shows is free, and the resulting sales can be astronomical. So publishers are always looking for authors with a media platform. Do you have one? What angle or hook can you provide to a producer or editor who will provide you with an interview or featured story? If you develop a strong enough hook, you can get a book contract based only on this aspect of your proposal. Do you have one? What angle or hook can you provide to a producer or editor who will provide you with an interview or featured story? If you develop a strong enough hook, you can get a book contract based only on this aspect of your proposal. Do you have one? What angle or hook can you provide to a producer or editor who will provide you with an interview or featured story? If you develop a strong enough hook, you can get a book contract based only on this aspect of your proposal.

Element # 7: Scheme: for this section of your proposal, provide a list of the titles of the proposed chapters, together with a brief general description of the contents.

Element # 8: Sample chapters: In this section of your proposal, simply attach the first two or three chapters of your proposed manuscript. Providing sample chapters is essential for an author for the first time. If their chapters are of high quality, they give the editor the confidence that he can produce a publishable manuscript in a timely manner.

Element # 9: Presentation: The presentation of your book proposal is as instrumental to its success as the content. Be sure to check carefully. If you think you’re finished, check it again. Read, correct and rewrite your proposal at least twenty times to be sure it is the best it can be. When the time comes to print the final draft, the body of the proposal must be double spaced and printed in black ink on clean white paper with a LaserJet printer. Finally, as with any commercial document, send your book proposal through FedEx. This will create the immediate impression that you are a professional who will be professional in your daily relationships with the editor.

Once you have incorporated these nine elements in the proposal of your book, you will be left with a finished product that deserves the respect of any editor. But to create a true book proposal, make sure … Define the concept of the book. Identify the audience of the book. And it outlines exactly how to get to that audience. Do these three things well, and you are sure to get a book contract. So do not waste your time. Work on your blockbuster book proposal today!

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